Franz Von Bayros, The Divine Comedy, ga332

Franz Von Bayros, The Divine Comedy, ga332

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Paradiso-Paradies-Paradise  Canto13

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Paradiso-Paradies-Paradise  Canto13

Original tipped-in plate by Franz Von Bayros from a separately issued portfolio of the full suite of images from the 1921 La Divina Commedia / Die Gottliche Komodie (1100 examples) and titled 'Sixty Illustrations To Dante's Divine Comedy'. No date or place of publication, but Zurich, Leipzig or Vienna. The few examples (6) found via WorldCat give a date of 1926 but I believe that these plates were printed during the initial run; when carefully compared to the 1921 bound plates, the images are identical but tipped onto larger leaves of higher quality paper. Plates 7 1/2x6 3/8 on a leaf 13x10


 

'The Divine Comedy (Italian: Divina Commedia) is an epic poem written by Dante Alighieri between c. 1308 and his death in 1321. It is widely considered the preeminent work of Italian literature, and is seen as one of the greatest works of world literature. The poem's imaginative and allegorical vision of the afterlife is representative of the medieval world-view as it had developed in the Western Church by the 14th century. It helped establish the Tuscan dialect, in which it is written, as the standardized Italian language. It is divided into three parts: Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso.

 On the surface, the poem describes Dante's travels through Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven; but at a deeper level, it represents, allegorically, the soul's journey towards God. At this deeper level, Dante draws on medieval Christian theology and philosophy, especially Thomistic philosophy and the Summa Theologica of Thomas Aquinas. Consequently, the Divine Comedy has been called "the Summa in verse".

 The work was originally simply titled Commedìa and was later christened Divina by Giovanni Boccaccio. The first printed edition to add the word divina to the title was that of the Venetian humanist Lodovico Dolce, published in 1555 by Gabriele Giolito de' Ferrari.' From Wikipedia


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